Fox Family Lawyers
Cynthia Moseley Fox
Attorney at Law
7751 Carondelet Avenue,
Suite 700
Clayton, Missouri 63105
(St. Louis)
314.727.4880

About Divorce Mediation

More and more, people are seeking mediation as a less combative way of terminating their marriage.  This is typically less costly...both financially and emotionally for both parties. Cynthia Fox is a trained and court-approved mediator who has helped many clients with the mediation approach.

What is Mediation? Divorce mediation is a process where the spouses meet with Cynthia Fox in her role as mediator. She acts to facilitate the informed and consensual resolution of the issues at stake. She will work on behalf of each of you for information to be provided. She will also make you aware of options to making effective decisions.

After all issues are resolved, Cynthia Fox then drafts the settlement documents to reflect those resolutions for presentation to the court. Most of the expense in most divorces is agreeing to a settlement. Current law does not allow the mediator to present the settlement to the court.

Normally, mediation is much more cost-effective than the traditional resolution through the legal system. The reason for this is that all of the decision-makers are at the same place at the same time, and they are not communicating their questions and requests via attorneys.

It’s no longer necessary for couples using a mediator to retain an attorney to file their divorce paperwork and settlement agreement with the court after it has been prepared by a qualified mediator. This opportunity applies so long as the case is a divorce, neither spouse retains counsel, and even if neither spouse is a resident of St. Louis County. If so, the couple can work with the county’s Family Resource Center to complete the process and pay only the normal court filing fee.

The hallmark feature of mediation is that it is based upon full disclosure (no secrets, no expensive discovery), and full voluntary participation by all: the people in conflict as well as the mediator. If one party decides that there is no longer a desire to mediate, mediation is concluded.

Mediation requires that each of the spouses appear for each mediation session. A mediator may not speak to only one of the spouses, unless that was specifically requested and approved by the other spouse. That request is unusual. If all do not agree to the request, it does not occur.